Trench composting

Image copyright Maynard.

There’s nothing very glamorous about trench composting, but it does have marvellous results, which is why stylish gardeners should take it very seriously indeed.

This method of adding goodness to the soil is perfect for hungry crops on light, well-drained soils, especially if you have a lot of kitchen scraps. The normal rules for composting apply (no meat, no bones etc).

I use compost trenches for french beans, pumpkins and tomatoes. I normally begin around this time of year by digging a trench about a foot deep and the same width, and add kitchen waste to it once a week. I cover each new layer of kitchen waste with well-rotted horse manure, and gradually fill in the trench until it has reached the top.

You must fill the trench at least two months before you plan to plant out your crops so that the waste is as well-rotted as possible. It is also worth throwing in worm tea or comfrey tea to speed up the rotting process and add extra goodness.

And that’s that. Your crops will thank you for it. They will be growing in super-rich soil, which will also be nice and warm thanks to the rotting taking place under the surface.

2 Responses

  1. Gillian

    wow- that is trench composting on a grand scale. It is worth noting that fish carcases and shellfish scraps can be dug in and covered over immediately. I dont have a dog that could dig them up, but if you do, make sure they are well covered. I have noticed a distinct improvement in my soil since doing this.

    Reply
  2. BOBBY

    HI I HAVE BEEN TRENCH COMPOSTING MANY YEARS NOW, JUST WANTED TO SAY I ADD BIO CHAR, AND RABBIT POOP ALSO, THEN PLENTY OF SCRAPS GROUND UP, WOW WHAT SOIL I HAVE, MY TOMATOE PLANTS ARE LOADED TO THE GROUND,HAVE 2 BY 4S HOLDING THEM UP, MY GARDEN IS ALL RAISED BEDS, LOVED READING YOUR TIPS TU LOVE GARDENING BOBBY

    Reply

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